abcdef.jpg

HAND POKE TATTOO FAQ

 

WHAT ARE HAND-POKED, STICK ’N POKE, OR MACHINE-FREE TATTOOS?

Hand-poked tattoos are tattoos made without the use of tattoo machines. While they are created with the same supplies as machine tattoos, stick ’n poke artists push needle and ink into the skin manually, without the aid of a machine. In doing so, artists create multiple dots that make up the lines and shading of the tattoo. This process causes the hand-poked method of tattooing to be slower than the machine method.

ARE HAND-POKED TATTOOS PERMANENT?

Yes. Like machine tattoos, they will remain in the skin so long as they are properly taken care of. 

DO HAND-POKED TATTOOS HURT MORE THAN MACHINE TATTOOS?

Hand-poked tattoos are less abrasive on the skin than machine tattoos, and often hurt less in comparison. However, not everyone has this experience. Some places on the body hurt more than others and everyone experiences pain in different ways.

WHY HAND-POKED TATTOOS?

There are many reasons someone might choose to get a hand-poked tattoo. Many prefer receiving a hand-poked tattoos as they feel that they hurts less than machine-tattoos, while others prefer the organic look of hand-poked tattoos. The distinct character of hand-poked tattoos and the unique experience of receiving them makes them the favoured method of getting tattoos for many people.

HOW LONG DO HAND-POKED TATTOOS TAKE TO HEAL?

Hand-poked tattoos often heal faster than machine tattoos because they tend to cause less trauma to skin. You can generally expect your hand-poked tattoo to be fully healed within 2-weeks time. That being said, everyone heals at a different rate, so don’t worry if your tattoo takes a bit longer.

ARE ALL DESIGNS SUITABLE FOR HAND-POKED TATTOOING?

As hand-poked tattoos take more time to complete than machine tattoos it would be best to select smaller and medium sized pieces, a good size would be anywhere from 2x2" to 5x5". Larger pieces can be completed by hand-poking but expect the process to be lengthy. Some designs may be too detailed to tattoo, along the same guidelines as machine tattoos, enough space between lines will be essential to allow the tattoo to properly heal.

CAN I USE NUMBING CREAM OR PAIN KILLERS?

This is a less frequently asked question than you might expect. You can use numbing cream, but very few tattoo studios will recommend it for several reasons. Firstly, it needs to be applied several hours before you sit for your tattoo and can only last for around thirty to forty-five minutes. Tattooing being an art-form and therefore not an exact science, means that sometimes there could be a period of waiting past your appointment time, while the tattooist finishes off a piece of work that took longer than expected. This makes it very difficult to time the application of the cream. Secondly, even if you manage to time its application correctly, the potential short working period of the cream makes it a very limiting to anything but the simplest and smallest of tattoos. Lastly, if your tattoo is not finished before the cream wears off, then the pain will come back with a vengeance! Your body has been fooled and will not be producing those handy pain-killing endorphins, so will be hit with the force of the returning pain with no protection.


From the tattooist's perspective, the creams can cause the skin to become a little puffy in some customers. This means that the tattooist needs to work harder to get the ink into the skin, which can cause additional trauma. This will obviously have some repercussions during the healing process and can create an undesirable amount of scabbing during that time.


Some tablet pain killers can also cause a problem. Aspirin is the biggest problem as it thins the blood and reduces clotting, this will cause excessive bleeding during your tattoo, which will affect the quality of the finished tattoo. Aspirin will also extend the healing time that your tattoo needs so it is best avoided. Paracetamol will have little effect (positive or negative), other than a placebo. Ibuprofen based painkillers can give minor pain relief during the process, by reducing localised swelling, and will not hinder the tattoo in any way.

CAN TATTOOS BE REMOVED?

They can, completely and without scaring. There are several options available to you if you have ink that you want rid of. The first, and by far most common way is the cover-up. This involves working with your tattoo artist to come up with a design that will go over and ‘cover-up’ the old one. There are a few misconceptions regarding cover-ups, it is not as easy as just doing another tattoo over the top. The new tattoo will sit in the same layer of skin (the dermis), as the old one, so the cover-up needs to be darker than the existing tattoo in order to over-power it. This makes very old or faded tattoos easier to cover up than new bright ones. This also means that the new tattoo generally has to be a great deal bigger than the one to be covered up, so that the old design can be lost in the new one. Obviously this very much depends on the tattoo to be covered and the skill of your artist.


The second option available to you is laser removal. This can be very effective, again depending on age and colour of the tattoo, but can also be very time consuming. Have a look at the Laser Removal for additional information.


The third option available is a combination of both of the above. The laser removal can be used to reduce the density of the offending tattoo, so that a much more desirable (and often smaller), tattoo can be used to cover up the old design. This takes much less laser treatment than removal, and gives much better cover-up results on the new tattoo.

SHOULD I HAVE A DRINK BEFORE MY TATTOO TO STEADY MY NERVES?

No. This is not advisable for several very real reasons, other than the obvious difficulties of tattooing a drunk person, and the fact that any good tattooist will refuse to tattoo you if you have. The main reason is that alcohol thins your blood considerably. In turn this causes excessive bleeding while you are having the tattoo, which not only makes it difficult for the tattoo artist, but will have the effect of ‘washing out’ ink as it is being put in. This makes the process much longer, and can produce poor results.


Alcohol can have an effect for several days, so it is also not a good idea to have a tattoo after a night drinking, even if you have not consumed anything on the day.

WHAT SHOULD I DO ON THE DAY OF MY TATTOO?

There are several things you can do to make your experience easier and more enjoyable.


Firstly, try and make sure you have had something to eat and drink about an hour before your tattoo. During the tattoo, your body behaves in a way very similar to going into shock, as it generates endorphins to deal with the attack on the skin. This can cause a drop in blood sugar, resulting in light-headedness, and sometimes nausea or fainting. Having a meal and consuming natural sugars, such as orange juice can help to prevent this. If you feel faint during your tattoo, let your artist know immediately, and they will help you through it. Don’t be ashamed of telling them, if you have chosen your studio wisely, they will be totally sympathetic to your needs and help you through the experience with dignity. Often a tattoo studio will offer you hard boiled sweets or a lolly to help keep your sugar up during the tattoo.


Secondly, think about what you are going to wear. You know where you are likely to get your tattoo, so make sure you dress so that you can expose this general area while at the same time maintaining your dignity. Usually the studio area can be covered (door closed or a screen put in place), if you are feeling particularly vulnerable. Have these conversations with your studio and they should be able to tell you what they can put in place to make you feel comfortable.


Don’t wear your Sunday best. While tattoo ink will generally not stain clothes, and your artist will do everything they can to keep your clothing clean, there is always the possibility of getting ink on your clothes so dark clothing is favourable. Tattoo ink is very concentrated, and will go a very long way, so it’s always best to bear this in mind when choosing the day’s wardrobe. If you do need to remove tattoo ink from your clothing, you will need to do so on a very hot wash.


Thirdly, shave the area if possible. If you know where you are having your tattoo, shave the area (and surrounding area), the morning prior to getting inked. Even if you don’t think it needs doing, shave it anyway, as even the smallest, downiest hairs can have a detrimental effect on the tattoo process, but don't worry, your tattoo artist will still shave you if you haven’t. This will save time applying the stencil and mean that more of the time you are paying for is going towards your tattoo rather than preparing the area. It is a small thing, but your tattoo artist will really appreciate that you have taken the time to consider this. However this is not a huge concern as we do not feel there should be any financial pressure on the customer during preparation, so will only charge for the time you are actually being tattooed.


Other things you may want to consider bringing might include an MP3 player, or other distraction like a book or smart phone etc. Some people like to chat to the tattooist, others like stony silence, others prefer a distraction like the things mentioned above.

CAN I CATCH ANYTHING FROM GETTING A TATTOO?

Yes you can, but it is very unlikely. If you have followed the advice above and chosen your tattoo studio wisely, then the chances of catching anything are similar to a visit to the dentist. Everything will be either sterilized to medical standards or be disposable single use. Again, a reputable tattooist will be certified in infection control and have no issues discussing their procedures with you. If they do, don’t think twice, just walk away.


If correct infection control procedures are not followed, there is the potential of transmitting blood-borne pathogens from one customer to the next, or from the tattooist to the customer. This could potentially include HIV or Hepatitis. However, before you become unduly worried, the vast majority of tattooists work safely, and the chances of you contracting anything like this from having your tattoo are extremely slight. Again, if you choose your studio wisely, this won’t even be a consideration.


The other thing you might hear people say is;


“I got my tattoo/piercing form Joe Blogs Tattoo, and it got infected, I must have got the infection from there!”


This is absolute rubbish! Apart from blood-borne infection (viral), as mentioned above, you won’t catch an infection like they are discussing from a studio, as what they are talking about is an infection caused by bacteria. You don’t catch bacteria, it builds up over time. That only means one thing, poor aftercare.


That applies for tattooing, piercing and laser removal, the only way bacteria will infect you is if you’re not keeping the wound (yes it is a wound), clean. 

Kaylen Parcell

(530) 628-0702

Allure Salon
239 Broadway Street
Chico, CA 95928

  • Yelp for business

Kay Brow, Tat & Fine Art